Selected books/dvd's on rugby:
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Rugby World Cup Golden Moments
Rugby World Cup Golden Moments
Product details:

Rugby World Cup Golden Moments

There have been a huge number of memorable moments in the 20-year history of the Rugby World Cup. Think of the last minute drop-goals to beat Australia by Rob Andrew (in 1995), and Johnny Wilkinson...

Format: DVD
Duration: 90 min.
Zone: 2

...more

Rugby World Cup 2007 Official Travel Guide
Rugby World Cup 2007 Official Travel Guide
Product details:

Author: Donna Dailey; Hope Caton; Mike Gerrard

Rugby World Cup 2007 Official Travel Guide

The only authorized guide for the 2007 Rugby World Cup, this full-color reference to the world's third largest sporting event is packed with stadium maps and information on sports bars, big screen rugby...
  
Format: Softcover 

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The History of the Rugby World Cup
The History of the Rugby World Cup
Product details:

Author: Gerald Davies

The History of the Rugby World Cup

Featuring interviews with players past and present, including Sean Fitzpatrick, Jonathan Davies, Philippe Sella, Will Carling, Keith Wood and Martin Johnson, this guide offers a detailed analysis of the...
  
Format: Paperback 

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Rugby! What Rugby?
Rugby! What Rugby?
Product details:

Author: Roger Entwistle

Rugby! What Rugby? Rugby World Cup 2007

Category: Humour
  
Format: Softcover
Pages: 72
Illustrations: 8   

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The Official ITV Sport Rugby World Cup 2007 Guide
The Official ITV Sport Rugby World Cup 2007 Guide
Product details:

Author: Chris Hawkes

The Official ITV Sport Rugby World Cup 2007 Guide

"The Rugby World Cup 2007 Guide" gives the reader all they need to know about the sixth contest for the Webb Ellis Trophy. The book features a guide to all 20 competing teams, with information on their...
  
Format: Softcover 

...more

 

category: Rugby World Cup
MATCH REPORTS

Blacks tops in Murrayfield murder

Back to Results

September 23rd, 2007

The All Blacks savaged Scotland 40-0, in a thoroughly one-sided clash in Edinburgh.

Scotland looked every bit the second string side they were, and never threatened a purposeful, if not clinical, New Zealand side. The All Blacks never shifted out of cruise mode, and one sensed they could have lifted the intensity to really blow the hosts away at any stage. This is a ominous sign for those who await Graham Henry’s charges in the quarterfinal.

The fact that Scotland wanted to conserve themselves for their crucial pool match against Italy was well documented in the build-up to this match. But that won’t be any solace to a side who looked on a different planet, skill-wise.

When playing New Zealand you want to be accurate in your execution and fundamental skills. Parity at set phases is useful, and heart and self belief is essential. While their performance was characterised by plenty of heart, it was sorely devoid of any of the other characteristics.

They were comprehensively outplayed in every facet of the game, particularly at scrum time, where the All Blacks folded them on numerous occasions. This robbed them of a primary attacking platform, which was a hammer blow considering they never saw much ball in general play. When they did, poor option taking and fundamental errors thwarted any chance of breaching the All Blacks defensive line.

Credit, however, has to go a solid defensive performance by New Zealand. The manner in which they dominated the collisions left one wondering if the conditioning programme the Scots keep talking up is an fictional construct designed to somehow gain a pre-match psychological advantage.

This was, however, not a complete performance by New Zealand, and they’ll have to improve as the tournament progresses. Their possession and territorial dominance should have translated into more points on the board but unforced errors in good positions ensured that didn’t happen. But they’ll be pleased with their performance at the set phases though, from which their first two tries emanated.

The first, a simple move where Rodney So’oialo broke right off a scrum on the Scotland 5m line then switched inside to Richie McCaw who powered over. The second displayed everything that was good about the All Blacks. Again they broke right from 30m out and superb interplay in the backline, who displayed pace and purpose, saw Doug Howlett cross and become New Zealand’s all-time record try scorer.

They continued to lay seige on the Scotland goal line, and duly scored their third after the hosts had failed to repel a bulldozing Chris Masoe surge. The flanker set up the ruck from which Byron Kelleher picked and sniped around the blindside to score.

But Henry would have been ripping out the little hair he has left watching his team in the first 10 minutes of the third quarter. They camped in the Scotland red zone in that period, but failed to unhinge the defence, knock ons, turnovers and generally poor option taking blunting their attempts to keep the scoreboard ticking over.

Ali Williams rounded off an unstructured move to get his side going, and Carter scooped up a knock on on his 10m line to sprint in from long range. Doug Howlett concluded the rout after Scotland allowed play to get loose.

Henry the perfectionist will lambaste his side for their lack of opportunism. They should have put at least more 20 points on the Scots, with Carter in particular poor with the boot - kicking just four of eight attempts.

Scotland will write this performance off, claiming that the Italy match was always going to be their main focus. The result will no doubt have an impact on the squad going into the that fixture. The question for them will be whether they can lift themselves before then.

By Ryan Vrede

New Zealand - Try: Richie McCaw, Doug Howlett (2), Byron Kelleher, Ali Williams, Dan Carter. Conversion: Dan Carter (2). Penalty: Carter (2)
Scotland -

Posted by Ryan | Keo.co.za





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