Selected books/dvd's on rugby:
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Rugby World Cup Golden Moments
Rugby World Cup Golden Moments
Product details:

Rugby World Cup Golden Moments

There have been a huge number of memorable moments in the 20-year history of the Rugby World Cup. Think of the last minute drop-goals to beat Australia by Rob Andrew (in 1995), and Johnny Wilkinson...

Format: DVD
Duration: 90 min.
Zone: 2

...more

Rugby World Cup 2007 Official Travel Guide
Rugby World Cup 2007 Official Travel Guide
Product details:

Author: Donna Dailey; Hope Caton; Mike Gerrard

Rugby World Cup 2007 Official Travel Guide

The only authorized guide for the 2007 Rugby World Cup, this full-color reference to the world's third largest sporting event is packed with stadium maps and information on sports bars, big screen rugby...
  
Format: Softcover 

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The History of the Rugby World Cup
The History of the Rugby World Cup
Product details:

Author: Gerald Davies

The History of the Rugby World Cup

Featuring interviews with players past and present, including Sean Fitzpatrick, Jonathan Davies, Philippe Sella, Will Carling, Keith Wood and Martin Johnson, this guide offers a detailed analysis of the...
  
Format: Paperback 

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Rugby! What Rugby?
Rugby! What Rugby?
Product details:

Author: Roger Entwistle

Rugby! What Rugby? Rugby World Cup 2007

Category: Humour
  
Format: Softcover
Pages: 72
Illustrations: 8   

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The Official ITV Sport Rugby World Cup 2007 Guide
The Official ITV Sport Rugby World Cup 2007 Guide
Product details:

Author: Chris Hawkes

The Official ITV Sport Rugby World Cup 2007 Guide

"The Rugby World Cup 2007 Guide" gives the reader all they need to know about the sixth contest for the Webb Ellis Trophy. The book features a guide to all 20 competing teams, with information on their...
  
Format: Softcover 

...more

 

category: Rugby World Cup
MATCH REPORTS

Chokers!

Back to Results

October 6th, 2007

The All Blacks self-imploded yet again as France claimed a thrilling 20-18 victory in Cardiff.

All week, the Tricolores spoke of the famous World Cup semi-final eight years ago at Twickenham, which they won despite being heavy underdogs. On that occasion, France fought their way back from a 14-point deficit. On Saturday night, New Zealand blew a 13-0 lead to exit a World Cup at the quarter-final stage for the first time. Whether this defeat will cost coach Graham Henry his job remains to be seen, but the impact on New Zealand’s already fragile psyche will be devastating.

France’s insistence on wearing their new dark blue jerseys infuriated the All Blacks, who were forced to don their alternative silver strip. Those bad vibes were evident during an emotional haka when the French players walked forward to within inches of the All Blacks in scenes reminiscent of the 1995 World Cup final.

France looked good early on, but lost Serge Betsen when his head collided with Joe Rokocoko’s knee in the tackle. The flanker appeared to swallow his tounge and suffer convulsions, before leaving the field dazed. That saw the introduction of Imañol Harinordoquy off the bench, which at least gave the French another line-out option.

However, New Zealand soon took control and opened their account with a Dan Carter penalty.

Then came two moments of magic from Luke McAlister. The inside centre burst through the French defence, taking play inside the 22. The ball was recycled and sent wide to Ali Williams, who put a foot into touch just before grounding the ball over the tryline. A minute later, McAlister did it again and this time offloaded to Jerry Collins. The flanker passed back to McAlister whose momentum carried him over the line.

The French played a conservative game at first, refusing to run the ball inside their half. Lionel Beauxis had been selected at flyhalf ahead of Frédéric Michalak because of his accurate boot, but his first penalty attempt missed the mark. Jean-Baptiste Elissalde then botched a penalty when he was given a go.

France also struggled in the line-outs – an area of the game they expected to dominate – losing three of their own throws, but a Beauxis penalty gave them some hope at half-time.

The Tricolores should have scored straight after the break when Cédric Heymans hacked the loose ball down the left-hand touchline. However, instead of putting boot to ball again, and backing himself to win the race to the in-goal area, he stopped to pick it up and the momentum was lost. Fortunately for France they retained possession, McAlister was yellow carded for a professional foul on the tryline and Beauxis kicked the penalty.

Bernard Lapote pulled off his two veterans – Raphaël Ibañez and Fabien Pelous – and brought on Dimitri Szarzewski and Sébastien Chabal. Soon after, Thierry Dusautoir drew the teams level when a sustained French attack created space for the flanker out wide.

Graham Henry reacted by replacing Byron Kelleher and Carter with Brendan Leonard and Nick Evans. His team reacted by scoring a second try through Rodney So’oialo, although McAlister missed the crucial conversion.

France responded superbly when Michalak – on for Beauxis – broke free from a blatant forward pass and gave Yannick Jauzion the try-scoring pass.

The All Blacks had all the ball in a nerve-racking final five minutes, but the French defence rose to the challenge. McAlister bizarrely had a drop-goal attempt from 45m out when the New Zealanders could easily have set one up just outside the 22 a few moments earlier. That tactical brain explosion probably summed it up for an All Blacks side that simply crumbled under the pressure.

New Zealand –Tries: Luke McAlister, Rodney So’oialo. Conversion: Dan Carter. Penalties: Carter (2).
France –Tries: Thierry Dusautoir, Yannick Jauzion. Conversions: Lionel Beauxis (2). Penalty: Lionel Beauxis.

By Simon Borchardt | Keo.co.za





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