Selected books/dvd's on rugby:
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Rugby World Cup Golden Moments
Rugby World Cup Golden Moments
Product details:

Rugby World Cup Golden Moments

There have been a huge number of memorable moments in the 20-year history of the Rugby World Cup. Think of the last minute drop-goals to beat Australia by Rob Andrew (in 1995), and Johnny Wilkinson...

Format: DVD
Duration: 90 min.
Zone: 2

...more

Rugby World Cup 2007 Official Travel Guide
Rugby World Cup 2007 Official Travel Guide
Product details:

Author: Donna Dailey; Hope Caton; Mike Gerrard

Rugby World Cup 2007 Official Travel Guide

The only authorized guide for the 2007 Rugby World Cup, this full-color reference to the world's third largest sporting event is packed with stadium maps and information on sports bars, big screen rugby...
  
Format: Softcover 

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The History of the Rugby World Cup
The History of the Rugby World Cup
Product details:

Author: Gerald Davies

The History of the Rugby World Cup

Featuring interviews with players past and present, including Sean Fitzpatrick, Jonathan Davies, Philippe Sella, Will Carling, Keith Wood and Martin Johnson, this guide offers a detailed analysis of the...
  
Format: Paperback 

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Rugby! What Rugby?
Rugby! What Rugby?
Product details:

Author: Roger Entwistle

Rugby! What Rugby? Rugby World Cup 2007

Category: Humour
  
Format: Softcover
Pages: 72
Illustrations: 8   

...more

The Official ITV Sport Rugby World Cup 2007 Guide
The Official ITV Sport Rugby World Cup 2007 Guide
Product details:

Author: Chris Hawkes

The Official ITV Sport Rugby World Cup 2007 Guide

"The Rugby World Cup 2007 Guide" gives the reader all they need to know about the sixth contest for the Webb Ellis Trophy. The book features a guide to all 20 competing teams, with information on their...
  
Format: Softcover 

...more

 

category: Rugby World Cup
MATCH REPORTS

Pumas crash Paris party

Back to Results

September 7th, 2007

France face an early World Cup exit after suffering a 17-12 defeat to Argentina on Friday night.

It was the Pumas fifth win against the Tricolores in their last six meetings, and arguably the most important.

Argentina had all the ball in the first half and should have been further ahead than 17-9 at the break. The French totally dominated the possession stakes in the second 40, but could not make it count as the brave Pumas defence stood firm.

While the Argentineans had tears in their eyes during the singing of the national anthems, they were composed and clinical from the moment David Skrela got the sixth World Cup underway.

Argentina’s forwards quickly assumed control, poaching France’s first line-out and exposing the hosts around the fringes. They made effective use of the rolling maul and dominated the scrums, with the exception of one 5m effort at the end of the first quarter when France claimed a critical tighthead.

The selection of Juan Martin Hernandez at flyhalf suggested the Pumas would adopt an expansive approach, but apart from the odd venture out wide they stuck to their traditional 10-man game. Hernandez and inside centre Felipe Contepomi kicked countless up-and-unders, while there were four unsuccessful drop goal attempts.

The hosts, in general, were rattled by the ferocity of the Pumas attack. On the rare occasions they did get their hands on the ball, they either knocked on or failed to make the pass.

The Pumas had 70% territory and possession in the first half, but almost failed to capitalise. They led just 9-6 after half an hour before France gifted them the first try of the World Cup. Yet another Pumas up-and-under had bounced into the hands of the French who counterattacked from inside their half. However, Remy Martin’s pass was intercepted and sent wide to Pumas fullback Ignacio Corleto, who hesitated for a split second before backing himself and sprinting over the line. Contepomi’s conversion hit the upright, but at 14-6 the capacity crowd feared the worst.

Contepomi’s fourth penalty gave the Pumas an 11-point lead, but Skrela kicked his third just before the break to keep France in the game.

The Tricolores made an impressive start to the second half and looked set to score when a driving maul saw them progress from the Pumas 10m line to within a metre of the tryline. Argentina appeared to have first collapsed the maul and then come in from the side, yet referee Tony Spreadbury surprisingly failed to produce a yellow card. A minute later, the Pumas were awarded a penalty and relieved the pressure.

Spreadbury continued to frustrate the French, calling “advantage over” when the hosts turned over possession seconds after a Pumas knock on. The Englishman was also lenient on the Pumas at ruck time, when there were hands all over the ball, and at the maul, when players came in from offside positions.

When the French finally did get a kickable penalty, Skrela hooked it past the right-hand upright. But he made amends on the 60-minute mark to bring France within five, before being substituted by Frederic Michalak.

With 10 minutes to go, Michalak fluffed a critical penalty, prompting the introduction of goal-kicking scrumhalf Jean-Baptiste Elissalde. But it was Contepomi who had another two shots at goal, including one on the stroke of full time. Both missed the mark.

That resulted in an anxious last movement for the Pumas but their defence, as it had all game, stood firm.

France – Penalties: David Skrela (4).
Argentina – Try: Ignacio Corleto. Penalties: Felipe Contepomi (4).

By Simon Borchardt | Keo.co.za





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